Interview with Ben Andrews from ELG Carbon Fibre Ltd

You will deliver a presentation in the pre-conference workshop focusing on “Closed Loop Recycling of Carbon Fibre Waste into Automotive Parts” – could you please give us a quick sneak peak of what you would be sharing with our audience?

The audience will understand how virgin material formats impact the recyclability of manufacturing and post-consumer waste. Recycled fibre formats will be discussed, and the potential weight savings addressed.

 

What are the main challenges & opportunities for the Carbon Fibre and Composites industry?

As the automotive industry moves from an idea of “body in black” (100% carbon) fibre, to a mixed material platform, challenges in assembly, joining, coating and end of life disassembly all become much more relevant. The advantage of this though, is that right material can used in the right place and engineers are adopting a much more wholistic view to design the system rather than just replacement bolt on metal style components in carbon fibre.

What does the Carbon Fibre market in Europe look like?

The drive for low/zero emissions cars in Europe is forcing European OEMs to consider lighter, high performance materials. This is increasing the demand for carbon fibre but still with exceptionally tight price targets.

 

What do you see as the most significant shifts for Carbon Fibre and Composites industry in the past 2 years?

The differences in future mobility. Car ownership models are changing meaning perceptions to cars can be changed too. The idea of feel and touch/NVH requirements will change potentially opening up the door for “new” composite materials. Sustainability is also becoming a hot topic around carbon fibre and the relevant embodied energy from cradle to grave is being addressed more and more.

 

Why do you feel it’s important for people to attend GOCarbonFibre Conference 2019?

Exposure to Industry experts with connections to the heart of the supply chain. Networking and understanding the latest trends from these people is invaluable within what is at the moment, still a relatively small industry.